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Brain Procedures

Occipital Neuralgia

Occipital neuralgia is a condition in which the sufferer develops throbbing or piercing headaches. The headache may feel as though it begins in the neck and spreads to the head. More commonly, it is felt on one side of the head, although it may be felt on both sides. This condition is more common in women and is often thought to be due to the occipital nerve that runs from the spinal cord to the head becoming trapped in muscle. In addition to painful headaches, symptoms include sensitivity to light and a tender scalp. Causes include spinal cord compression, arthritis in the neck, tumors, diabetes, and injury, such as whiplash. Treatments include anti-inflammatory medication, muscle relaxants, pain medication, nerve blocks, steroid injections, and physical therapy. Severe cases may require surgery.

Dear Dr. Kremer,

On May 12 it will be four months since your hands created a miracle on my brain, and I would like to send you my thanks. I feel that I am doing pretty well, and will be seeing Dr. Glisson in June regarding my right eye. We feel so fortunate to have had you as our neurosurgeon!

Sincerely,

K&S W

(616) 738-4420
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Have you had an MRI in the last 12 months?